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Fact Sheet: Autism & Pervasive Developmental Disorders

Definition

Autism and Pervasive Developmental Disorder (PDD) are developmental disabilities that share many characteristics. Usually evident by age three, autism and PDD are neurological disorders that affect an individuals ability to communicate, understand language, play, and relate to others.

Characteristics

Individuals with autism or PDD vary widely in abilities, intelligence, and behaviors. Some individuals do not speak; others have limited language that often includes repeated phrases or conversations. People with more advanced language skills tend to focus on a small range of topics and have difficulty with abstract concepts. Repetitive activities, a limited range of interests, and impaired social skills are generally evident as well. Unusual responses to sensory information (i.e., loud noises, lights, certain textures of food or fabrics) are also common. Other characteristics are as follows:

Vocational Implications

Resources

Autism National Committee

635 Ardmore Avenue
Ardmore, PA 19003
Web site: www.autcom.org
A national think tank advancing research, understanding, and positive relationship and communication-based approaches to assisting children and adults with autism.

Autism Society of America

7910 Woodmont Avenue, Suite 300
Bethesda, MD 20814
Voice: (301) 657-0881; (800) 328-8476 x150
Fax: (301) 657-0869
Web site: www.autism-society.org
Provides basic information and referral, as well as updates on autism research and advocacy efforts.

Indiana Institute on Disability and Community
Indiana Resource Center for Autism

Indiana University
2853 East 10th Street
Bloomington, IN 47408-2601
Voice: (812) 855-6508
TTY: (812) 855-9396
Fax: (812) 855-9630
E-mail: prattc@indiana.edu
Web site: www.isdd.indiana.edu/~irca
Provides training, technical assistance, and information on meeting the needs of individuals with autism.

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